For Parents

Before bringing your child to the dentist 

Most of our very young patients can’t wait to visit us again!
We love to make their first experience at the dentist fun and aim to make them feel special by counting their teeth and giving them their own toothbrush gift bag.

We have two lady therapists on our Complete Dental team, who are fully qualified and experienced with treating children between 4-17 years. They are able to take more time with your child, which helps to increase their confidence with having dental treatment. If any complex questions or treatments arise our dentists are always on hand to help address them. Read more: reduced fees for children seeing our therapists

When your child visits one of our lady therapists we often take a photo of their first visit to send to them or place on our ‘Star Patients’ board.

Baby (deciduous) teeth are softer than adult teeth so we often find decay in children’s teeth.  However baby teeth are very important to keep as they help the adult teeth to erupt correctly, so we need to ensure our young patients have a good diet along with routine toothbrushing twice daily and regular visits to the dentists. Read more: kids diet and toothbrushing tips

Because decay commonly occurs between the baby molar teeth, where it is hidden from view, we take routine low radiation digital x-rays to allow early detection and prevention of problems associated with larger cavities.

If your child does require dental treatment we try to achieve a positive outcome for them to prevent the dental phobias that were more common in generation’s past.

To help us to give them a positive start to their lifelong dental experience it’s important that parents follow the guidelines from a children’s dental specialist as listed below:

  • Start early to gently desensitize your child. From babyhood, feel, look and touch in their mouth, as it is a personal zone that can feel invasive. If your child finds it difficult to allow you to brush their teeth, they will likely find dental visits more distressing
  • Like toothbrushing, going to the dentist should be a normal part of growing up
  • Be positive and matter of fact about the routine nature of visiting the dentist
  • Avoid going into detail about procedures
  • Try not to use words such as hurt, needle or drill
  • Your dentist tries to treat children using non frightening terms
  • The first visit is usually for a look and a talk and to count their teeth using the dental mirror
  • If you are anxious about going to the dentist please do not mention this in front of your child
  • Try to delay the appointment if your child is tired or ill and make morning visits if possible

If extensive dental treatment is needed for an anxious child, after discussing their dental needs with you, we can refer to a child specialist for possible treatment under general anaesthesia.

Please contact us on 3396 4094 to make an appointment for your child’s dental appointment

READ MORE – Kids Emergency Care

Please click on below questions for answers –

Q: What age should my child come to the dentist and how often should they have a check-up?

Q: Does it matter if baby teeth become decayed?

Q: How many baby teeth will my child have?

Q: Should my child be using an electric/power or manual toothbrush?